The Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG) is a multidisciplinary team within the Department of Global Health & Development in the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.The Group is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and conducts research across the SE Asia region, and beyond. It provides a focus of expertise on the diverse public health problems associated with communicable disease control internationally and carries out research that is in support of and for policy reform.

Prof Richard Coker with Prof Vonthanak Saphonn, Rector of UHS, Cambodia. He is accepting a Memorandum of Understanding between UHS and LSHTM on behalf of Prof Peter Piot, Director of LSHTM. May 2015. 

Congratulations to Richard Coker who has received a confirmed letter from the Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, for his Adjunct Professor position. 

Prof Richard Coker's talk session "Challenges to TB Control: Lessons from the field"at Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University,  on 24 September 2014

Jointly organised by:

1. Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)

2. Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University 

Video on "Research in Cambodia and Indonesia protects the world from disease threats"

Interview with Dr. James Rudge about his team's research in Cambodia and Indonesia.


Video on "Influenza: Preparing for the next pandemic"

Tom Drake and Prof Richard Coker discuss pandemic influenza mitigation measures as they affect Southeast Asia, a region considered by many to be the front line of any future battle against the disease.

News

23 April 2015

Paper entitled "Mortality Attributable to Seasonal Influenza A and B Infections in Thailand, 2005–2009: A Longitudinal Study" has been published in Oxford Journals.

Ben S. Cooper, Surachai Kotirum, Wantanee Kulpeng, Naiyana Praditsitthikorn, Malinee Chittaganpitch, Direk Limmathurotsakul, Nicholas P. J. Day, Richard Coker, Yot Teerawattananon and Aronrag Meeyai authored the paper entitled "Mortality Attributable to Seasonal Influenza A and B Infections in Thailand, 2005–2009: A Longitudinal Study", which has been published in  Oxford Journals, Am. J. Epidemiol. (2015)doi: 10.1093/aje/kwu360.

Abstract

Influenza epidemiology differs substantially in tropical and temperate zones, but estimates of seasonal influenza mortality in developing countries in the tropics are lacking. We aimed to quantify mortality due to seasonal influenza in Thailand, a tropical middle-income country. Time series of polymerase chain reaction–confirmed influenza infections between 2005 and 2009 were constructed from a sentinel surveillance network. These were combined with influenza-like illness data to derive measures of influenza activity and relationships to mortality by using a Bayesian regression framework. We estimated 6.1 (95% credible interval: 0.5, 12.4) annual deaths per 100,000 population attributable to influenza A and B, predominantly in those aged ≥60 years, with the largest contribution from influenza A(H1N1) in 3 out of 4 years. For A(H3N2), the relationship between influenza activity and mortality varied over time. Influenza was associated with increases in deaths classified as resulting from respiratory disease (posterior probability of positive association, 99.8%), cancer (98.6%), renal disease (98.0%), and liver disease (99.2%). No association with circulatory disease mortality was found. Seasonal influenza infections are associated with substantial mortality in Thailand, but evidence for the strong relationship between influenza activity and circulatory disease mortality reported in temperate countries is lacking.

The paper is available online here.  

CDPRG Overview of Activities  download