The Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG) is a multidisciplinary team within the Department of Global Health & Development in the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.The Group is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and conducts research across the SE Asia region, and beyond. It provides a focus of expertise on the diverse public health problems associated with communicable disease control internationally and carries out research that is in support of and for policy reform.

Prof Richard Coker with Prof Vonthanak Saphonn, Rector of UHS, Cambodia. He is accepting a Memorandum of Understanding between UHS and LSHTM on behalf of Prof Peter Piot, Director of LSHTM. May 2015. 

Congratulations to Richard Coker who has received a confirmed letter from the Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, for his Adjunct Professor position. 

Prof Richard Coker's talk session "Challenges to TB Control: Lessons from the field"at Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University,  on 24 September 2014

Jointly organised by:

1. Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)

2. Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University 

Video on "Research in Cambodia and Indonesia protects the world from disease threats"

Interview with Dr. James Rudge about his team's research in Cambodia and Indonesia.


Video on "Influenza: Preparing for the next pandemic"

Tom Drake and Prof Richard Coker discuss pandemic influenza mitigation measures as they affect Southeast Asia, a region considered by many to be the front line of any future battle against the disease.

 

News

16 December 2016

Paper entitled "Evaluating the impact of healthcare provider training to improve tuberculosis management: A systematic review of methods and outcome indicators used" has been published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Shishi Wu, Imara Roychowdhury and Mishal Khan authored the paper entitled "Evaluating the impact of healthcare provider training to improve tuberculosis management: A systematic review of methods and outcome indicators used" which has been published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijid.2016.11.421

Abstract

Background

Developing human resources capacity is vital for tuberculosis (TB) control in low and middle-income countries. Although investments in TB healthcare provider (HCP) training programs have increased, it is unclear whether these are robustly evaluated. The objective of this systematic review is to synthesize the methods and outcome indicators used to assess TB HCP training programs.

Methods

We conducted a systematic scoping review of publications reporting on evaluations of training programs for HCPs–including doctors, nurses, paramedics and lay health workers - in three electronic databases, Google Scholar and five websites of non-profit organizations. We extracted data on the study location, population trained, outcomes assessed and evaluation approach.

Results

After screening 499 unique publications, 21 were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The majority of evaluations were conducted in Africa. The most common evaluation method was review of patient records (8, 38%) and post-training interview with trainees (7, 33%). In terms of outcomes, more than half of the studies (12, 57%) evaluated knowledge acquisition of trainees with only six (29%) assessing on-the-job behavior change.

Conclusions


Even though more funds have been invested in HCP training, publications from robust evaluations assessing impact on quality of care and behavior change are limited.

The paper is available online here.