The Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG) is a multidisciplinary team within the Department of Global Health & Development in the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.The Group is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and conducts research across the SE Asia region, and beyond. It provides a focus of expertise on the diverse public health problems associated with communicable disease control internationally and carries out research that is in support of and for policy reform.

Prof Richard Coker with Prof Vonthanak Saphonn, Rector of UHS, Cambodia. He is accepting a Memorandum of Understanding between UHS and LSHTM on behalf of Prof Peter Piot, Director of LSHTM. May 2015. 

Congratulations to Richard Coker who has received a confirmed letter from the Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, for his Adjunct Professor position. 

Prof Richard Coker's talk session "Challenges to TB Control: Lessons from the field"at Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University,  on 24 September 2014

Jointly organised by:

1. Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)

2. Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University 

Video on "Research in Cambodia and Indonesia protects the world from disease threats"

Interview with Dr. James Rudge about his team's research in Cambodia and Indonesia.


Video on "Influenza: Preparing for the next pandemic"

Tom Drake and Prof Richard Coker discuss pandemic influenza mitigation measures as they affect Southeast Asia, a region considered by many to be the front line of any future battle against the disease.

 

News

3 March 2016
Paper entitled "Are current case-finding methods under-diagnosing tuberculosis among women in Myanmar? An analysis of operational data from Yangon and the nationwide prevalence survey" has been published in BMC Infectious Diseases.

MS. Khan, TM. Khine, C. Hutchison, RJ. Coker, KM. Hane, AL. Innes and S. Aung authored the paper entitled "Are current case-finding methods under-diagnosing tuberculosis among women in Myanmar? An analysis of operational data from Yangon and the nationwide prevalence survey" which has been published in BMC Infectious Diseases, BMC series – open, inclusive and trusted 2016 16:110, DOI: 10.1186/s12879-016-1429-y.

Abstract

Background
Although there is a large increase in investment for tuberculosis control in Myanmar, there are few operational analyses to inform policies. Only 34 % of nationally reported cases are from women. In this study, we investigate sex differences in tuberculosis diagnoses in Myanmar in order to identify potential health systems barriers that may be driving lower tuberculosis case finding among women.

The letter is available online here.