The Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG) is a multidisciplinary team within the Department of Global Health & Development in the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.The Group is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and conducts research across the SE Asia region, and beyond. It provides a focus of expertise on the diverse public health problems associated with communicable disease control internationally and carries out research that is in support of and for policy reform.

Congratulations to Richard Coker who has received a confirmed letter from the Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, for his Adjunct Professor position. 

Prof Richard Coker's talk session "Challenges to TB Control: Lessons from the field"at Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University,  on 24 September 2014

Jointly organised by:

1. Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (CDPRG), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)

2. Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University 

Video on "Research in Cambodia and Indonesia protects the world from disease threats"

Interview with Dr. James Rudge about his team's research in Cambodia and Indonesia.


Video on "Influenza: Preparing for the next pandemic"

Tom Drake and Prof Richard Coker discuss pandemic influenza mitigation measures as they affect Southeast Asia, a region considered by many to be the front line of any future battle against the disease.

News

16 February 2015

Paper entitled "Introducing One Health to the Ethical Debate About Zoonotic Diseases in Southeast Asia" has been published in Bioethics.

Benjamin Capps, Michele Marie Bailey, David Bickford, Richard Coker, Zohar Lederman, Andrew Lover, Tamra Lysaght and Paul Tambyah authored the paper entitled "Introducing One Health to the Ethical Debate About Zoonotic Diseases in Southeast Asia", which has been published in Bioethics, DOI: 10.1111/bioe.12145. Article first published online: 10 FEB 2015

Abstract

Pandemic plans recommend phases of response to an emergent infectious disease (EID) outbreak, and are primarily aimed at preventing and mitigating human-to-human transmission. These plans carry presumptive weight and are increasingly being operationalized at the national, regional and international level with the support of the World Health Organization (WHO). The conventional focus of pandemic preparedness for EIDs of zoonotic origin has been on public health and human welfare. However, this focus on human populations has resulted in strategically important disciplinary silos. As the risks of zoonotic diseases have implications that reach across many domains outside traditional public health, including anthropological, environmental, and veterinary fora, a more inclusive ecological perspective is paramount for an effective response to future outbreaks.

The paper is available online here.

CDPRG Overview of Activities  download